Help change Oregon’s brutal wildlife trapping rules

Your comments to change existing wildlife trapping rules in Oregon are needed before this Thursday.

Currently, the state holds title to the worst trapping practices in the nation, including provisions which allow animals to be left in leg-hold traps for up to seven days.

In April I wrote that the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission was seeking comments on changing the state’s trapping rules because the Audubon Society of Portland, Humane Society of the United States and other conservation groups petitioned ODFW to reform its inhumane trapping practices. The ODFW Commission rejected the petition based on technical issues, but instructed staff to return in June with recommendations addressing the petition’s concerns. According to Portland Audubon, “The recommendations that emerged on May 24 demonstrate that ODFW staff failed to get the message.”

This Thursday, June 7, the ODFW Commission will review and establish state trapping regulations for the next two years. Please see Portland Audubon for concerns of conservation organizations that were ignored during previous reviews of the state’s outdated trapping mentality. A sample of a letter makes it easy to comment. Please let them know what you think!

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2 thoughts on “Help change Oregon’s brutal wildlife trapping rules

  1. Thank you for this post, Tracie. In 2000, I received a frantic phone call from my neighbor who was out walking with his two small children and they stumbled upon a steel jawed leghold trap. It was located only a few feet from a busy walking path and hidden in tall grass. A phone call to ODFW revealed that it is legal to place a trap in such a location without any warning signs. The changes suggested by Audubon would be negligible to professional trappers, but would greatly increase public safety and reduce animal suffering. I hope everyone will take a couple of minutes out of their busy day to weigh in.

    • That’s a perfect example of one reason these rules need to change. And I wholeheartedly agree with your statement, “The changes suggested by Audubon would be negligible to professional trappers, but would greatly increase public safety and reduce animal suffering.” Thanks, CJR.

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